Archive for the ‘Buster Keaton’ Category

BKV3 Blu-ray Cover.jpg

Distributor: Cohen Media Group

Release Date: August 20, 2019

Region: Region A

Length:

Seven Chances – 00:57:17

Battling Butler – 01:18:21

Video: 1080P (MPEG-4, AVC)

Main Audio:

Seven Chances

2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio

Battling Butler

5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio
2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio

Subtitles: None

Ratio:

Seven Chances – 1.33:1

Battling Butler – 1.32:1

Notes: A DVD edition of this Volume is also available.

Charles Chaplin once went on record about his particular film aesthetic by saying, “I don’t need interesting camera angles, [because] I am interesting.” It’s a true enough statement, but Buster Keaton’s early career proves that it is unnecessary to choose one over the other. Buster Keaton was always interesting, but his approach to filmmaking was also incredibly cinematic. Andrew Sarris probably articulated this best when he wrote:

“The difference between Keaton and Chaplin is the difference between prose and poetry, between the aristocrat and the tramp, between adaptability and dislocation, between the function of things and the meaning of things, eccentricity and mysticism, between man as a machine and man as angel… There are those who would go further and claim Keaton as pure cinema as opposed to Chaplin’s essentially theatrical cinema.” –Andrew Sarris (The American Cinema: Directors and Directions, 1929-1968)

It’s impossible to improve upon this comparison. Both men epitomized the silent comedian, but Buster Keaton epitomized silent cinema. He is recognized not only as one of the silent cinema’s most hilarious comedians but as one of the cinema’s most brilliant silent filmmakers.

Keaton_Seven_Chances_1925b

Seven Chances

When Buster learns that he will inherit $7,000,000 if—and only if—he is married by seven o’clock that same evening, he takes the opportunity to finally ask his sweetheart to be his wife. Unfortunately, a misunderstanding results in her refusal of his proposal. Desperate, he proposes to any and all of the women he sees, and this results in nothing but embarrassment. Finally, an advertisement in the newspaper draws an entire hoard of women to the chapel. The film’s final comedic chase is classic Keaton.

Jean Arthur

Jean Arthur had a small role in Seven Chances.

Poster

Battling Butler

Battling Butler stands a few notches above Seven Chances, but both films were based on popular stage plays. The story follows an effete millionaire named Alfred Butler who falls for a young lady from Kentucky. Unfortunately, her father and brother think him too much of a weakling to provide for their daughter. In an effort to earn their favor, Butler’s manservant leads them to believe that Butler is a prizefighter with the same name.

The Presentation:

3 of 5 Stars

The Blu-ray disc is protected by the standard Blu-ray case with a slip sleeve that features artwork framed by the Cohen Media Group’s “C” logo. It seems poor form to criticize their practice of branding their films by framing their art in this manner, but one does wish that they would have included a slip cover that features the art without the C-framing as they did with their release of The Great Buster. The art for Volume 3 is a return to form and an improvement over the art used for Volume 2 as the film titles are integrated into the design (as it was in their first volume).

The disc’s menu features footage from both films and is both attractive and intuitive to navigate.

Picture Quality:

4 of 5 Stars

Cohen offers two more quality restorations with this release, but most viewers will agree that they aren’t quite as remarkable as those contained in the two previous volumes. This isn’t their fault, as the source materials were simply inadequately preserved and exhibited more damage than these restoration efforts could overcome.

The restoration team inspected 25 elements while preparing to restore Seven Chances. 16 of these elements were digitized for further comparison. The eventual restoration made use of a first generation nitrate positive with amber tinting from the Library of Congress, and a second generation safety duplicate from the Cohen Film Collection was used to replace missing frames. Overall, the result probably represents the best that this film can look given the state of the materials available. (Although the “technicolor” opening may look marginally superior on the Kino release in regards to color.) The color in the opening is almost imperceptible, and one wonders why it was used in the first place as it adds nothing to the storytelling. One assumes it was an arbitrary gimmick used to fill theater seats. In any case, amber tinted monochrome sequences look much better, though those who own the Kino releases may not notice an overwhelming improvement here. What’s more, damage is evident but never terribly problematic here.

The team inspected 13 elements while preparing their restoration of Battling Butler before digitizing eight of these for further analysis. Four of these were eventually selected for this restoration: the original negative, a vintage positive print, a re-release print from the 1940s, and a second generation duplicate negative. The original negative was used where possible, but it was often necessary to use the duplicate negative to replace missing portions and frames (including the entire first reel). The amber tinting was indicated by the vintage print of the film (which was used as a reference). This choice was validated by information included on the tails of the original negative. The result shines in many areas and disappoints in others. Fine detail is often impressive, and damage is certainly as good as one might reasonably expect. However, certain moments of emulsion damage were unable to be fixed. However, this never becomes a large enough issue to ruin one’s viewing experience.

Sound Quality:

4.5 of 5 Stars

Both features are modernized by the additions of a new score. Robert Israel’s score for Seven Chances is given a 2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio transfer that is more than adequate, and his score for Battling Butler is given a 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio transfer in addition to a standard 2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio mix. The 5.1 mix is noticeably more dynamic, but either choice is adequate for the film in question. We can’t say that either score faithfully represents their respective film’s original soundtrack because the original films didn’t have a soundtrack. However, the music does provide quality accompaniment. The only trouble with the score for Battling Butler is that it includes a sampling of Charles Gounod’s “The Funeral March of a Marionette.” The trouble is that most cinephiles associate this piece of music with Alfred Hitchcock, and this makes it a questionable choice since this might become distracting for some viewers. Admittedly, this is a matter of taste.

Special Features:

2.5 of 5 Stars

Buster Keaton: The Daredevil – (03:44)

Just like the short “featurettes” that were included on the first two volumes, The Daredevil was obviously created out of mostly interview footage from the production of The Great Buster and footage from the Keaton films. It’s an engaging three minutes, but it really repeats much of what is said in some of those previous supplements (not to mention material in The Great Buster). It might have been better to include something that focuses on the two movies included here.

Seven Chances Restoration Trailer – (00:55)

Battling Butler Restoration Trailer – (00:45)

It is nice to have the restoration trailers included here, but the original marketing materials for these films would have been a more substantial addition to the disc.

Final Words:

The Buster Keaton Collection: Volume 3 probably isn’t as significant as either of the previous volumes for the simple reason that these films aren’t quite as good. However, it is still an essential release for Keaton fans.


BKV2 Blu-ray Cover.jpg

Distributor: Cohen Media Group

Release Date: July 09, 2019

Region: Region A

Length:

Sherlock Jr. — 00:45:31
The Navigator — 01:06:11

Video: 1080P (MPEG-4, AVC)

Main Audio:

Sherlock Jr.

2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio

The Navigator

5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio

2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio

Subtitles: None

Ratio: 1.32:1

Notes: A DVD edition of this Volume is also available.

Charles Chaplin once went on record about his particular film aesthetic by saying, “I don’t need interesting camera angles, [because] I am interesting.” It’s a true enough statement, but Buster Keaton’s early career proves that it is unnecessary to choose one over the other. Buster Keaton was always interesting, but his approach to filmmaking was also incredibly cinematic. Andrew Sarris probably articulated this best when he wrote:

“The difference between Keaton and Chaplin is the difference between prose and poetry, between the aristocrat and the tramp, between adaptability and dislocation, between the function of things and the meaning of things, eccentricity and mysticism, between man as a machine and man as angel… There are those who would go further and claim Keaton as pure cinema as opposed to Chaplin’s essentially theatrical cinema.” –Andrew Sarris (The American Cinema: Directors and Directions, 1929-1968)

It’s impossible to improve upon this comparison. Both men epitomized the silent comedian, but Buster Keaton epitomized silent cinema. He is recognized not only as one of the silent cinema’s most hilarious comedians but as one of the cinema’s most brilliant silent filmmakers.

Sherlock Jr.

Sherlock Jr.

Sherlock Jr. features one of Buster Keaton’s best comedic performances. It tells an incredibly simple story, and this ends up being a terrific advantage as it allows Keaton to organically and efficiently move from gag to gag while moving the story forward. Buster portrays a movie projectionist who hopes to become a great detective. After being accused of stealing a pocket watch from the father of his sweetheart, he daydreams himself into one of the movies that he is projecting and merges with the figures and the backgrounds on the screen. He “snoops out brilliant discoveries” as he imagines that he is a “master detective” named Sherlock, Jr. The result is a lighthearted film fantasy that is certain to please fans of the silent screen.

The Navagator - Still 02.jpg

The Navigator 

While Sherlock Jr. was considered a failure upon its release, The Navigator was one of Keaton’s biggest box-office hits. In fact, Keaton claimed that it was his best feature. This reviewer respectfully disagrees with this assessment and prefers a great many of his other efforts (including Sherlock Jr.). It is certainly an amusing film, but the ship setting doesn’t allow Keaton to showcase his impressive comedic stunts with the same level of abandon. What’s more, the story required quite a few scenes that were purely expository. His skill at moving his stories forward organically with his gags takes a backseat to “adventure,” but this adventure isn’t nearly as suspenseful or as spectacular as it would be in The General.

The story follows a spoiled rich man named Rollo (Buster Keaton) who decides to marry Betsy (his sweetheart) and sail to Honolulu on a whim. She rightfully rejects his proposal, but he decides to go on the trip alone. Unfortunately, he boards the wrong ship—The Navigator—which is owned by Betsy’s father. When her father is taken by foreign saboteurs, she boards the boat to search for him before the aforementioned saboteurs cut the ship loose, and she and Rollo are set adrift. Silliness ensues.

The Presentation:

3 of 5 Stars

The Blu-ray disc is protected by the standard Blu-ray case with insert art framed by the Cohen Media Group’s “C” logo. It seems poor form to criticize their practice of branding their films by framing their art in this manner, but one does wish that they would have included a slip cover that features the art without the C-framing as they did with their release of The Great Buster. It should also be said that their artwork for this release isn’t quite as refined as the art for their Volume One and the upcoming Volume 3. The primary difference is in the font used for the two film titles. The text hasn’t been incorporated into the art and seems to have been added as an afterthought.

The disc’s menu features footage from both films and is both attractive and intuitive to navigate.

Picture Quality:

4.5 of 5 Stars

Both of these Cohen restorations have the edge over the previous Kino release (especially in terms of age related damage), but their transfer for Sherlock Jr. has a slight edge over their transfer for The Navigator.

The majority of Sherlock Jr. was taken from a restored scan of a first generation interpositive safety print, but certain missing shots were taken from a second generation internegative and a third generation safety print. Luckily, there aren’t any noticeable or distracting shifts in the quality or look of these shots. It’s great to report that this transfer looks terrific in motion and has healthier grain resolution than previous releases of the film.

The Navigator was taken from a third generation safety duplicate and was restored from a 4K scan. The third generation elements look nice but are understandably less impressive than the first generation elements that made up the majority of their restoration for Sherlock Jr. There is a bit more fine detail inherent than was seen in Kino’s transfer despite a decidedly thick layer of grain. Clarity is quite disappointing, but one really can’t blame the transfer. The trouble is obviously inherent in the source elements, and one feels that this might be the very best that this particular film can look in this format.

Sound Quality:

4.5 of 5 Stars

How should one go about scoring the sound transfer of a silent film? Both films feature a new score. Timothy Brock has composed a score for Sherlock Jr. and Robert Israel composed the score The Navigator. This second feature is actually given two mixes of Israel’s score. The 5.1 mix is noticeably more dynamic, but either choice is adequate for the film in question. We can’t say that either score faithfully represents their respective film’s original soundtrack because the original films didn’t have a soundtrack. However, the music does provide quality accompaniment.

Special Features:

3 of 5 Stars

Buster Keaton: The Great Stone Face – (04:25)

The Great Stone Face is in keeping with the two featurettes included on Volume One. It’s a charming but decidedly lightweight commentary on Keaton’s comedic stoicism. Like the previous featurettes, this one has been built from mostly unused interview footage from the production of Peter Bogdanovich’s The Great Buster. Leonard Maltin, Bill Hader, Quentin Tarantino, and other carry-overs from the documentary make mostly generalized statements about Keaton’s trademark manner. It’s worth watching and may add to people’s appreciation of Keaton’s work even if it isn’t terribly revelatory.

Buster Keaton: The Comedian – (03:51)

The Comedian follows suit but shifts the focus to Keaton’s comedy and its vaudeville origins. Again, this short clip is fun and might add to the viewer’s appreciation of Keaton’s work, but it isn’t by any means a comprehensive examination of the subject.

Sherlock Jr. Restoration Trailer – (01:23)

The Navigator Restoration Trailer – (01:01)

It is nice to have the restoration trailers included here, but one wonders how these films were originally sold to the public. One wishes that the vintage originals could have been found and included.

Final Words:

The Buster Keaton Collection: Volume 2 is an essential release for Keaton fans, but it should also appeal to cinephiles with an interest in silent cinema in general.

BUSTER KEATON COLLECTION

Cohen Media Group plans to release quite a few Buster Keaton titles on Blu-ray, and we hope to review each of them as they become available.

This is the list of currently available reviews:

The Great Buster: A Celebration

This is a documentary about the life and career of Buster Keaton. It was directed by Peter Bogdanovich.

The Buster Keaton Collection: Volume 1

Volume One contains two feature-length Buster Keaton classics: The General (1926) and Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928).

The Buster Keaton Collection: Volume 2

Volume Two will contain two feature-length Buster Keaton classics: Sherlock Jr. (1924) and The Navigator (1924).

The Buster Keaton Collection: Volume 3

Volume Three will contain two feature-length Buster Keaton classics: Seven Chances (1925) and Battling Butler (1926).

We will continue to update this list as new titles are announced or released. 

Blu-ray Cover Buster Keaton Vol. 1.jpg

Distributor: Cohen Media Group

Release Date: May 14, 2019

Region: Region A

Length:

The General — 01:19:25
Steamboat Bill, Jr. — 01:11:18

Video: 1080P (MPEG-4, AVC)

Main Audio: 5.1 English DTS-HD Master Audio

Alternate Audio: English: Dolby Digital 5.1

Subtitles: None

Ratio: 1.32:1

Notes: A DVD edition of this Volume is also available.

Charles Chaplin once went on record about his particular film aesthetic by saying, “I don’t need interesting camera angles, [because] I am interesting.” It’s a true enough statement, but Buster Keaton’s early career proves that it is unnecessary to choose one over the other. Buster Keaton was always interesting, but his approach to filmmaking was also incredibly cinematic. Andrew Sarris probably articulated this best when he wrote:

“The difference between Keaton and Chaplin is the difference between prose and poetry, between the aristocrat and the tramp, between adaptability and dislocation, between the function of things and the meaning of things, eccentricity and mysticism, between man as a machine and man as angel… There are those who would go further and claim Keaton as pure cinema as opposed to Chaplin’s essentially theatrical cinema.” –Andrew Sarris (The American Cinema: Directors and Directions, 1929-1968)

It’s impossible to improve upon this comparison. Both men epitomized the silent comedian, but Buster Keaton epitomized silent cinema. He is recognized not only as one of the silent cinema’s most hilarious comedians but as one of the cinema’s most brilliant silent filmmakers. The General and Steamboat Bill, Jr. both illustrate the reasoning behind this reputation.

The General

Re-release Half Sheet

“I was more proud of that picture than any I ever made.” –Buster Keaton

It is shocking to imagine that The General was considered a disappointment (both in terms of its critical reception and box office earnings), because it is considered a masterpiece today. Sight and Sound consistently list it as being amongst the “greatest films ever made,” and it is impossible to provide a solid argument against its inclusion on such lists. One might even go as far as to say that it is the birth of the action film.

The General One Sheet

Steamboat Bill, Jr.

SBBJ - Re-release Half Sheet.jpg

“I was mad at the time, or I would never have done the thing.” –Buster Keaton (about one of the many iconic stunts that feature in Steamboat Bill, Jr.)

This too is one of Keaton’s undisputed masterworks despite the fact that it wasn’t a hit upon its release.

Both of these titles should be experienced by cinephiles.

Steamboat Bill, Jr - Half Sheet.jpg

The Presentation:

3 of 5 Stars

The Blu-ray disc is protected by the standard Blu-ray case with insert art framed by the Cohen Media Group’s “C” logo. It seems poor form to criticize their practice of branding their films by framing their art in this manner, but one does wish that they would have included a slip cover that features the art without the C-framing as they did with their release of The Great Buster.

The disc’s menu features footage from both films and is both attractive and intuitive to navigate.

Picture Quality:

4.5 of 5 Stars

Keaton fans may be wondering if these new 4K Restoration transfers of The General and Steamboat Bill, Jr. are a significant upgrade from the previous Kino Lorber release, and it seems to these eyes that Cohen’s disc is indeed superior. For one thing, there is considerably less damage on display. The restoration work seems to have been handled with a great deal of care, and The General looks especially impressive as there is a wealth of fine detail on display throughout the film. This was an especially pleasant surprise as films from this period are rarely this pristine. Clarity is also much better than anyone has a right to expect from a film of this vintage, and the dynamic range on display is also worth complimenting. Steamboat Bill, Jr. is admittedly—albeit slightly—less impressive. There is an abundance of fluctuation in terms of density, and it is a bit too blown out for fine detail to distinguish itself. However, it seems that this is a result of the actual source and not the fault of the restoration or the transfer. In fact, the level of detail is still much better here than most will expect from such an old film. Some may lament a noticeably thicker layer of organic grain than was on display in The General, but purists will know better than to complain.

Sound Quality:

4.5 of 5 Stars

How should one go about scoring the sound transfer of a silent film? Both 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio tracks feature an orchestral score by Carl Davis and everything sounds fine. We can’t say that it represents the film’s original soundtrack, because the original film didn’t have a soundtrack.

Special Features:

3 of 5 Stars

Buster Keaton: The Luminary – (05:19)

This brief appreciation of Buster Keaton’s talent has been built out of unused footage from the production of Peter Bogdanovich’s The Great Buster. Quentin Tarantino, Leonard Maltin, Paul Dooley, Bill Hader, Jon Watts, and carry-overs from that production discuss Keaton and his lasting appeal as footage from his vast output illustrates their commentary. It manages to be unique in its content instead of simply reiterating what we have already learned from the aforementioned documentary, but one shouldn’t expect a seriously thorough examination of the subject at hand. It’s a charming but lightweight addition to the disc.

Reflections on The General – (05:28)

Like The Luminary, this featurette is quite charming without being terribly informative. In fact, the same description can be used for this more focused appreciation of The General. The only difference is that this particular featurette does actually re-use footage pulled directly from The Great Buster (instead of relying only on unused footage from that production). Specifically, Quentin Tarantino’s comment about his admiration for action movies and how The General is one of the first in that genre. Luckily, the majority of what we are shown here will be “new” to those who saw the feature length documentary. The interviewees are usually engaging without being particularly revelatory, but it does add to one’s appreciation of Keaton’s film.

The General Restoration Trailer – (01:46)

Steamboat Bill, Jr. Restoration Trailer – (00:53)

It is nice to have the restoration trailers included here, but one wonders how these films were originally sold.

Final Words:

The Buster Keaton Collection: Volume 1 is an essential release for Keaton fans, but it is also a great introduction for those who haven’t yet discovered his work.

Blu-ray Cover - The Great Buster

Distributor: Cohen Media Group

Release Date: April 02, 2019

Region: Region A

Length: 01:41:03

Video: 1080P (MPEG-4, AVC)

Main Audio: 5.1 English DTS-HD Master Audio

Alternate Audio: English: Dolby Digital 5.1

Subtitles: None

Ratio: 1.78:1

Notes: A DVD edition of the film is also available.

The Great Buster - Banner.jpg

“Charles Cohen, whom I’ve known for a while, asked me if I was interested in possibly making documentary films on Buster Keaton and Douglas Fairbanks. I quickly said yes and [suggested] that we start with Keaton.” –Peter Bogdanovich (Press Book, 2018)

It is difficult not to see this documentary as built-in promotional gimmick for the Cohen Media Group’s collection of Buster Keaton films. However, such motivations don’t necessarily make the film unworthy of its viewership. It’s nice to report that The Great Buster: A Celebration works as a primer for those who may be unfamiliar with Buster Keaton’s life and work, and it covers many of the more important points of his life and career. It is fair to say that the film might even inspire new interest in the director’s work (which was very likely Bogdanovich’s intention).

If there is a problem to be found here, it is born out of the fact that it was produced much too late to be truly comprehensive. Many of Keaton’s friends, family, and associates are either deceased or were too old to participate (although we are happy to report the presence of Norman Lloyd). One may recall a three-part documentary series on Keaton’s life entitled Buster Keaton: A Hard Act to Follow. This particular production was released in 1987 and was able to include a good number of people who knew and worked with Keaton (including his widow, Eleanor). Better yet, much of the narration was taken from archival television and radio interviews with Keaton himself. It covered the same territory in more intricate detail, and felt more intimate and personal.

One might argue that the two hour and forty minute duration allowed for a more comprehensive approach, but the truth is that one of the weaknesses of that earlier documentary was that it was padded for length and tended to repeat itself at times. The film’s superiority is due to the production’s use of Keaton’s own voice as narration, and the interview subjects that it chose to include.

It goes without saying that Bogdanovich was unable to resurrect these participants for his own feature. Instead, he was forced to interview a variety of comedians, actors, and filmmakers who claim to have been influenced by Keaton. To be fair, these interviewees do a decent job at regurgitating much of the same information that was included in that earlier production, but most of these individuals wouldn’t (or shouldn’t) be considered experts on the subject (though there are a few debatable exceptions).

“We tried to get as broad a cross-section as we could with filmmakers, performers, [and] friends. Fans and experts and others who were influenced by Keaton or felt something special about him. There were some people that we tried to get but we couldn’t work it out, like Johnny Depp and Jackie Chan, whose work makes him a kind of modern Buster.” –Peter Bogdanovich (Press Book, 2018)

The result is best described—as the title suggests—as “a celebration” or appreciation of Keaton and his body of work, and there is certainly value in that.

One Sheet.jpg

The Presentation:

4 of 5 Stars

The Blu-ray disc is protected by the standard Blu-ray case with insert artwork that features the film’s theatrical one sheet design framed by the Cohen Media Group’s “C” logo. Cohen also includes a small booklet that features credits and film related photography. We are happy to announce that a slipcover that features the one sheet design without the “C” Logo framing has been included with this release. One only wishes that this was their standard practice.

The disc’s menu features footage from the films made by Buster Keaton and is both attractive and intuitive to navigate.

Picture Quality:

4 of 5 Stars

Cohen Media Group’s high definition transfer is a solid one, but it is only as good as the archival material allows. The television footage is pretty weak in just about every respect, but it is as good as one could possibly expect and represents the source elements adequately. Bogdanovich’s freshly produced “talking head” interview segments are all incredibly detailed and completely meet Blu-ray standards. Fine detail is very much in evidence here. Most of the footage taken from Keaton’s oeuvre looks pretty good here, but there are variations between different titles. Some show some pretty significant age related damage, and it seems unlikely that some of these issues can be adequately restored. A clip from one of his shorts (The Boat) shows particularly bad damage during one of the film’s most important moments. However, these variations in texture, grain structure, clarity, contrast, and detail are to be expected. It’s part of the documentary aesthetic. A variety of aspect ratios are on display, but this never becomes distracting since this is what one has come to expect from such a production.

Sound Quality:

4 of 5 Stars

Considering that there are only two primary audio elements utilized for this documentary—namely interview dialogue and music that plays over Keaton’s silent work—the disc’s 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio mix goes above and beyond the needs of the film. It’s a great audio transfer, but it is understandably not terribly dynamic.

Special Features:

0.5 of 5 Stars

Conversations from the Quad with Peter Bogdanovich – (28:49)

This is essentially a post-screening Q&A with Peter Bogdanovich (moderated by Richard Pena). It includes a pre-screening introduction by both Charles Cohen and Bogdanovich. Usually, this sort of feature would be quite welcome and an enjoyable addition to any disc. Unfortunately, this particular footage is marred by terrible sound that is nearly indistinguishable throughout most of the duration, and the image isn’t much better as it is shot from the very back of the room. Someone occasionally jerks the camera back and forth as they try to reframe on a cheap tri-pod. There are moments of interest throughout the Q&A, but it is very hard to hear what is being discussed. Honestly, it may have been better to leave this off of the disc as it doesn’t leave a very good impression.

Theatrical Trailer – (01:50)

The film’s theatrical trailer is included here as well.

Final Words:

The Great Buster will engage cinephiles who are new to the subject as it serves as a very good primer on the subject of his life and work. However, Keaton devotees may find themselves wishing for more. Either way, it’s not a bad way to spend a few hours.