Archive for the ‘It’s A Wonderful Life (1946)’ Category

IAWL - UHD & BLU-RAY

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Release Date: October 29, 2019

Region: Region Free

Length: 02:10:34

Video: 2160P (HEVC, H.265)

Main Audio: English Mono Dolby TrueHD

Alternate Audio:

English Audio Description
Spanish Mono Dolby Digital
French Mono Dolby Digital
Italian Mono Dolby Digital
German Mono Dolby Digital
Japanese Mono Dolby Digital

Subtitles: English SDH, English, Spanish, French, Italian, German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Finnish, and. Japanese

Ratio: 1.33:1

Notes: This is the 4K UHD debut of this title. However, we should warn collectors that the included Blu-ray does not include a 1080P transfer of the 4K remaster. In fact, it doesn’t even contain a transfer of the original black and white film. Instead, we are given the same Blu-ray disc of the “colorized” version of the film that was included in support of the previous three Blu-ray editions.

However, this post also examines the standard Blu-ray release of the 4K Restoration.

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“It was the story I had been looking for all my life! A man, a good man, ambitious but so busy helping others, life seems to pass him by. Despondent, he wishes he’d never been born. He gets his wish. Through the eyes of a guardian angel, he sees the world as it would have been had he not been born. Wow! What an idea. The kind of idea that when I got old and sick and scared and ready to die – they’d still say, ‘He made The Greatest Gift.’” –Frank Capra

The Greatest Gift” originated as a short story by Philip Van Doren Stern. Stern gave the story to friends as a Christmas card when he couldn’t find a publisher for it, but it isn’t often mentioned that he found various publishers for it soon after this informal release. It was published first as a book and was later included in various magazines (sometimes re-titled “The Man Who Was Never Born”). The story seemed to encapsulate all of Frank Capra’s favorite themes. Capra had built his reputation championing the “common man,” and the same “love thy neighbor” philosophy is apparent throughout the director’s entire filmography.

Capra had already directed quite a few films that are undisputed classics, but none eclipse It’s A Wonderful Life—which stands strong as the director’s masterpiece. After being nominated for five Academy Awards (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Film Editing, and Best Sound Recording), the film passed into cinema limbo and was all but forgotten until television revived it many decades later.

Worse yet, the FBI flagged It’s A Wonderful Life for what they perceived to be communist propaganda, and most critics charged the film with being “saccharin.” Capra was known for his sentimentality. The press often labeled his films “Capra-corn” for this very reason. Perhaps the sentimental nature of the film’s ending overshadowed the film’s rather dark subject matter. George’s crisis is one that we all face. Responsibilities keep us from the lives we plan for ourselves. We watch our dreams move farther away from us on a daily basis. How many people are actually lucky enough to live their dreams? Most of us end up settling or being forced by circumstance into a completely different life. Most of us are George Bailey. The film’s fantasy elements make us forget that this is actually a very simple story about a man drowning in the realities of life.

If the ending is sentimental, then this sentimentality has been well earned. It isn’t forced or shoehorned into the narrative. Audiences recognize the honesty of George’s struggle. This is why they are able to accept and perhaps even embrace the film’s unlikely ending. Viewers rejoice when George Bailey’s friends bail him out of his predicament at the last minute. It re-establishes the themes of the film and isn’t at all beyond the realm of plausibility. Classics are classics for a reason! This film is no exception.

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The Presentation:

4K UHD: 4 of 5 Stars

Blu-ray: 4 of 5 Stars

IAWL UHD COVER

The 4K UHD Edition

Paramount protects their UHD and Blu-ray discs in a standard 2-disc UHD eco-case, and this is more than a little annoying. Eco-cases don’t properly protect the discs or the artwork. The included sleeve features a new design that is reasonably attractive, but it is difficult to say if it is an improvement upon previous designs as this is a point of taste. Having said this, it is difficult not to wonder why none of the home video releases utilize any of the original marketing art. Perhaps Paramount feels that these designs wouldn’t appeal to modern sensibilities. Luckily, they have provided the eco-case with added protection in the form of a glossy cardboard slip cover that features the same artwork.

IAWL BLU-RAY COVER

The Blu-ray Edition

There’s not much difference here. Both Blu-rays are protected in a standard 2-disc UHD eco-case with a sleeve that features pretty much the same cover art that is used for the UHD release. A slip cover featuring this design is also included with this edition of the restored classic.

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Picture Quality:

4K UHD: 5 of 5 Stars

Blu-ray: 5 of 5 Stars

The 4K UHD Edition

Those who know what to expect from 35mm nitrate stock will be quite pleased with this 4K Digital Restoration upgrade despite the minor age related issues that are sometimes on display. Most of the initial 4K Scan was derived from the original camera negative since 13 of the 14 reels were still in relatively good condition. However, the ends of these reels had begun to deteriorate. The other two reels had either degraded to the point of uselessness or no longer survive, so it was necessary for the restoration team to use two different second generation fine-grain prints that were struck at the time of the film’s release. The resulting scan was then restored using the latest digital technology.

We are happy to report that It’s A Wonderful Life has never looked this terrific on home video. However, one does feel the need to remind viewers that the original image was never as sharp as modern films. This isn’t a weakness. It’s a natural part of the film aesthetic and one that many people actually miss. Having said this, there is an impressive level of fine detail evident throughout the film. There are some revelatory details to be discovered in this new transfer. Clarity is vastly improved upon when comparing this transfer than the one included on the previous Blu-ray editions. There’s naturally a layer of film grain that resolves more naturally than in previous transfers of the film. The previous editions were slightly marred by overly aggressive DNR, but such doesn’t seem to be the case here. Blacks are deep without crushing detail and whites are strong without blooming. If there is some minor fluctuations throughout the duration of the film, this is due to the fact that it was necessary for the team to make use of multiple sources to create the best possible image. This transfer is a fantastic holiday gift for fans of this classic film, but the real gift is that Paramount has created a new negative from this restoration so that the film can be preserved!

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The Blu-ray Edition

Naturally, the Blu-ray release of this new restoration—which one is forced to buy separately if they want to own this new restoration on both formats—is terrific as well! Everything that was said about the UHD transfer can be repeated here as the primary difference is that the Blu-ray’s resolution is 1080P and is rendered with a bit more compression. Sharpness might take a slight dip and the dynamic range is reduced, but this is a terrific Blu-ray image. (It really should have been included in the 4K UHD package.)

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Sound Quality:

4K UHD: 4 of 5 Stars

Blu-ray: 4 of 5 Stars

Both the 4K UHD and Blu-ray editions of this restoration release of It’s A Wonderful Life include a TrueHD mix that offers an improvement over the previous Blu-ray editions by virtue of actually being in high definition. It is a solid representation of the original mix that offers clear audio that is an obvious upgrade from the Dolby Digital tracks that graced the previous Blu-ray editions. Music might struggle slightly as a result of production limitations, but this is not the fault of this transfer. One imagines that this is the best that this track can sound, and it is nice to finally have the original mix in high definition!

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Special Features:

4K UHD: 2.5 of 5 Stars

Blu-ray: 2.5 of 5 Stars

Before discussing the included supplementary material, it is necessary to point out that all three of Paramount’s previously released featurettes is conspicuously missing here. First of all, A Personal Remembrance was originally included on DVD editions of the film and wasn’t carried over to any of the previous Blu-ray releases (despite being listed on the packaging for one of these). The fourteen-minute featurette is hosted by Frank Capra Jr. (who honors his father and his work on the film). We admit that this piece wasn’t terribly comprehensive, but it did include some very interesting vintage interview footage with Frank Capra and a short clip of James Stewart discussing the film. The archival footage of Capra and Stewart alone should be a good enough reason to port it over.

To make matters worse, The Making of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ — a made-for-television documentary about the making of this holiday classic that is hosted by Tom Bosley — is also missing. This twenty three-minute program contained quite a bit of interesting information and also featured retrospective interviews with director Frank Capra and James Stewart. It was a terrific addition to both the DVD and the Blu-ray releases of It’s a Wonderful Life. We imagine that Paramount may have felt that their new Secrets from the Vault documentary (which is 34 seconds shorter) covered some of the same territory, but there is footage and information here that cannot be found in the newer program.

Finally, the film’s Original Theatrical Trailer was included on the first three Blu-rays but isn’t included on this release. It is curious that Paramount didn’t seize this opportunity to carry over all three of these older supplements to their new line-up of supplements, but the studio has made several questionable choices concerning this release.

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Disc One (4K UHD & Blu-ray Edition)

Secrets from the Vault – (22:11)

Craig Barron (film historian) and Ben Burtt (sound designer) discus the film’s production history in this new featurette that covers some (but not all) of the topics covered in both The Making of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ and A Personal Remembrance. We learn about Capra’s departure from Columbia and the founding of Liberty films, production details such as how the fake snow was created (we even get to see actual test footage during this portion of the program, the masterful sound design, camera and optical effects, we are shown newly discovered footage that was deleted from the final film, the disappointing box-office, and the film’s wrap party (with quite a bit of silent home movie footage from this event).

It’s a terrific addition to the disc, but it certainly isn’t comprehensive enough to warrant the absence of the earlier two featurettes.

Restoring a Beloved Classic in 4K – (13:03)

Those interested in the digital restoration process will enjoy this nice featurette about the film’s 4k digital restoration. It’s a featurette that will add to one’s appreciation of this new restoration. Andrea Kalas and Laura Thornburg (Paramount archivists) discuss the process in some depth. We even get to see inside the vaults.

Original Cast Party Home Movies – (08:04)

This recently discovered home movie footage shows glimpses of the film’s cast and crew having a nice picnic-style gathering. It’s nice to see James Stewart as he holds Karolyn Grimes (Zuzu) and Frank Capra playing baseball. It’s a neat addition to the disc (although it would have benefited from an optional contextual commentary.

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Disc Two – (4K UHD & Blu-ray Edition)

The “Colorized” Version (Blu-ray)

COLOR TITLE

Color Screenshot B

The packaging for the 4K UHD/Blu-ray combo package is a bit misleading. One might assume that the Blu-ray disc contained in this package contains a 1080P transfer of the newly remastered 4K scan of the disc, but such is not the case in this particular instance. Instead we are given a colorized version of the feature. It is the same disc that Paramount included in the previous three Blu-ray editions of the film. This seems incredibly misleading since Paramount has given the new remaster its own Blu-ray release. It would be reasonable for consumers to expect the advertised Blu-ray in this package to contain the new 4K restoration in 1080P.

This reviewer isn’t a fan of colorization since one prefers to see the film as it was originally intended to be seen. Setting aside our initial disappointment, the colorized version does make a decent supplemental offering. We merely feel that it should have been included in addition to and not instead of the new scan in 1080P.

(Those who buy the Blu-ray edition of the restoration will also receive this “Colorized” version in that package.)

The transfer seems to be fairly decent as it exhibits some nice detail. One cannot expect the colors to be natural under the circumstances. Purists will probably wish to watch the original black and white version since it is more effective on almost every level.

This is the only supplement included on this disc.

IAWL - SS08

Final Words:

It’s A Wonderful Life is much more than a beloved holiday classic. It is Frank Capra’s masterpiece and it should have a place in everyone’s Blu-ray collection. The 4K UHD release is a huge upgrade from the previous three Blu-ray editions, and it easily earns our highest recommendation—but with some very strong reservations.

We cannot endorse Paramount’s choice to market this as a 4K UHD/Blu-ray Combo and then not include the newly restored remaster on Blu-ray. To substitute the colorized version for a proper Blu-ray of this new restoration is both misleading and incredibly disappointing. To make matters worse, none of the earlier supplements have been carried over to this new release.

The standard Blu-ray edition is also an upgrade from the previous three editions, but fans of the film will want to hold on to their older discs for the supplemental features since Paramount failed to carry them over to this new release. Why wouldn’t they carry them over? Is it laziness or apathy that has led to this easily remedied issue? Either way, the problems with this release are inexcusable. This film deserves better and the fans who love it deserve better.

IAWL - SS09

One Sheet

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Blu-ray Cover.jpg

Distributor: Paramount

Release Date: October 11, 2016

Region: Region A

Length: 131 min

Video: 1080P (MPEG-4, AVC)

Main Audio: English Dolby Digital Mono

Alternate Audio:

French Dolby Digital Mono Spanish Dolby Digital Mono

Subtitles: English, English SDH, French, Portuguese, Spanish

Ratio: 1.34:1

Bitrate: 39.00 Mbps

Notes: This film has had two previous Blu-ray releases and a number of DVD releases. This Platinum Anniversary Edition is essentially a re-packaging and does not represent any major overhaul. However, the advertised six “art cards” are exclusive to this set.

Title.jpg

“It was the story I had been looking for all my life! A man, a good man, ambitious but so busy helping others, life seems to pass him by. Despondent, he wishes he’d never been born. He gets his wish. Through the eyes of a guardian angel, he sees the world as it would have been had he not been born. Wow! What an idea. The kind of idea that when I got old and sick and scared and ready to die – they’d still say, ‘He made The Greatest Gift.’” –Frank Capra

“The Greatest Gift” originated as a short story by Philip Van Doren Stern, who famously gave the story to friends as a Christmas card when he couldn’t find a publisher for it, although it isn’t often mentioned that he found various publishers for it soon after it’s informal release. It was published first as a book and was later included in various magazines (sometimes re-titled “The Man Who Was Never Born”) The themes appealed to Frank Capra, who had built his reputation championing the “common man” and a “love thy neighbor” philosophy in his film work. The story seemed to encapsulate all of his favorite themes.

Capra had already directed quite a few films that are undisputed classics, but none eclipse It’s A Wonderful Life—which stands strong as the director’s masterpiece. After being nominated for five Academy Awards (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Film Editing, and Best Sound Recording), the film passed into cinema limbo and was all but forgotten until television revived it many decades later.

Worse yet, the FBI flagged It’s A Wonderful Life for what they perceived to be communist propaganda and most critics charged the film with being “saccharin.” Capra was known for his sentimentality. The press often labeled his films “Capra-corn” for this very reason. Perhaps the sentimental nature of the film’s ending overshadowed the film’s rather dark subject matter. George’s crisis is one that we all face. Responsibilities keep us from the lives we plan for ourselves. We watch our dreams move farther away from us on a daily basis, and the fact is that most of us never live the lives that originally hoped to live. The film’s fantasy elements make us forget that this is actually a very simple story about a man drowning in the realities of life.

If the ending is sentimental, then the sentimentality has been well earned. Audiences recognize the honesty of George’s struggle. This is why they are able to accept and perhaps even embrace the film’s unlikely ending. Viewers rejoice when George Bailey’s friends bail him out of his predicament at the last minute. It reestablishes the themes of the film despite its sentimentality. Classics are classics for a reason and this film is no exception.

SS01.jpg

The Presentation:

4 of 5 Stars

It’s A Wonderful Life has landed on Blu-ray for the third time to celebrate the film’s 70th Anniversary, and the discs are housed in the standard Blu-ray casing with new film-related artwork that is reasonably attractive but not necessarily superior to the artwork featured on the first two Blu-ray editions. The case is protected by an embossed slipcover featuring the same artwork.

70th Anniversary Edition.jpg

Also included inside the case are 6 attractive “art cards” that feature various posters and lobby cards for the film. The inclusion of these cards is the primary difference between this new edition and the two previous Blu-ray releases.

The menus are identical to those utilized for the previous two releases and feature a decorated Christmas tree. They are attractive and easy to navigate but one feels that they do not truly represent the film.

SS02.jpg

Picture Quality:

4 of 5 Stars

My review of the earlier Blu-ray releases of this film was not only extremely forgiving but actually quite enthusiastic. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to be enthusiastic this time around, because Paramount wasted an opportunity to offer fans something even better than this transfer, which is the same one that they have offered twice before. The image is reasonably sharp and a marked improvement over DVD editions of the film and contrast is very nice indeed. Unfortunately, there seems to be some slight digital noise reduction on display. It isn’t quite as bad as some might suggest, but it certainly hasn’t been done as subtly as one might hope. Luckily, this is really the only issue that stands out.

SS03.jpg

Sound Quality:

3 of 5 Stars

This Dolby Digital Mono mix is actually pretty decent, but why on earth wouldn’t Paramount take advantage of this new 70th Anniversary release and include a lossless audio upgrade? Could it possibly be anything other than laziness or apathy? Luckily, the track doesn’t contain the pops, hiss, and other distractions that one might expect from a vintage track. Dialogue is always clear and never distorted. Even Dimitri Tiomkin’s score sounds somewhat decent here. One cannot say for certain that a lossless track would be a marked improvement over this Dolby Digital transfer, but one would assume that such an upgrade might at least represent a marginal improvement.

SS04.jpg

Special Features:

2.5 of 5 Stars

Before discussing the included supplementary material, it is necessary to point out that one of Paramount’s previous featurettes is conspicuously missing here (and from the other two Blu-ray releases.  A Personal Remembrance is a fourteen-minute featurette with Frank Capra Jr. honoring his father and It’s a Wonderful Life. This wasn’t a very comprehensive featurette, but it did feature some interesting vintage interviews with Frank Capra and a short clip of James Stewart discussing the film. This feature was included on the more recent DVD releases of the film and is the only supplement not ported over for any of Paramount’s Blu-ray releases. While most (if not all) of the information covered on this absent featurette is covered in the Making of documentary included on the Blu-ray, it is still a little disappointing not to have it included in this so-called “new” Blu-ray package.

The “Colorized” Version – (HD)

color-title

The second disc in the set features a colorized version of the feature. I have never been a fan of colorization and prefer to see the film as it was originally intended to be seen. However, it is nice to have a good transfer of it included here because one never knows when a friend or relative will have a bias against black and white films. This version will at least allow these misguided people to enjoy the film (even if it is a mutilated version).

color-screenshot

The transfer certainly looks as good as can be expected. The transfer seems to be quite excellent with admirable detail. One cannot expect the colors to be natural because they simply aren’t. Purists will certainly wish to watch the original black and white version, which is more effective on almost every level.

The Making of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ – (480P) – (22:45)

The made-for-television documentary about the making of this holiday classic contains quite a bit of interesting information and features retrospective interviews with director Frank Capra and James Stewart. This is certainly a very welcome addition to the disc even if it isn’t quite as comprehensive as it should have been.

Original Theatrical Trailer – (1080P) – (01:48)

The original theatrical trailer is included here in high definition, and it is a nice little time capsule that offers fans of the film the opportunity to see how the film was marketed upon its release.

SS06.jpg

Final Words:

It’s A Wonderful Life is much more than a beloved holiday classic. It is Frank Capra’s masterpiece and it should have a place in everyone’s Blu-ray collection. Having said this, there is absolutely no reason for anyone who owns one of Paramount’s two previous releases to double-dip unless the prospect of owning the six included art cards is too irresistible to pass up. Frankly, Paramount hasn’t taken proper advantage of the film’s 70th Anniversary edition. At the very least, they should have included a lossless audio transfer and the absent A Personal Remembrance featurette that graced DVD editions of the film. This featurette is conspicuously missing from all three Blu-ray releases (and at least one of these advertised that it would be included). Even the relatively nice image transfer probably could have been improved by an all new 4K transfer. However, those who haven’t already added this important classic to their collections should certainly indulge, because it doesn’t look like Paramount is going to spring for anything better than this.

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 Review by: Devon Powell

[Note: Astute readers will notice that the score for each element of this disc has been reduced by half a star for this particular Blu-ray edition of the film. This does not mean that the discs are inferior to the other releases. It simply means that they should have improved upon the earlier releases and didn’t. One is willing to give Paramount the benefit of the doubt once, but to do so twice would be absolutely ridiculous.]

Cover

Distributor: Paramount

Release Date: 03/Nov/2009 & 01/Nov/2011 (Gift Set)

Region: Region Free

Length: 130 min

Video: 1080P (MPEG-4, AVC)

Main Audio:

English Dolby Digital Mono

Alternate Audio:

French Dolby Digital Mono
Spanish Dolby Digital Mono

Subtitles: English, English SDH, Spanish, French, Portuguese

Ratio: 1.34:1

Bitrate: 37.71 Mbps

Notes: This film has had two notable Blu-ray releases and a number of DVD releases. I will discuss the two Blu-ray releases in this review.

iawl ss 1 bw

“It was the story I had been looking for all my life! A man, a good man, ambitious but so busy helping others, life seems to pass him by. Despondent, he wishes he’d never been born. He get’s his wish. Through the eyes of a guardian angel, he sees the world as it would have been had he not been born. Wow! What an idea. The kind of idea that when I got old and sick and scared and ready to die – they’d still say, He made The Greatest Gift.” –Frank Capra

Frank Capra directed quite a few films that are undisputed classics, but none eclipse It’s A Wonderful Life. The film has become so beloved that it is rather surprising that the film was a box office disappointment. The film was also met with its share of criticism. The FBI flagged the film as communist propaganda and most critics charged the film with being “saccharin.” Capra was known for his sentimentality. The press often labeled his films “Capra-corn” for this very reason.

Perhaps the sentimental nature of the film’s ending overshadowed its darker moments. George’s crisis is one that we all face. Responsibilities keep us from the lives we plan for ourselves. We watch our dreams move farther away from us on a daily basis.

Audiences recognize the honesty of these darker moments. This is why they are able to accept and perhaps even embrace the film’s unlikely ending. When George Bailey’s friends bail him out of his predicament at the last minute, many people rejoice. It reestablishes the themes of the film despite its sentimentality.

Classics are classics for a reason and this film is no exception.

iawl ss 2 bw

The Presentation:

4 of 5 Stars

It’s a Wonderful Life has been given two releases that should satisfy its many fans. In the first release, the two discs are protected by a standard Blu-ray case with film related artwork and a slipcover.

cover2

The more recent release is essentially a repackaging of the same two discs in a bulkier box. The box features a window that showcases a cardboard cutout of a Christmas tree. An ornament hangs down from the top of this tree. (This ornament is the only new feature of this “gift set.”) The ornament is a small bell with the film’s title painted on it. This larger box also contains a standard Blu-ray case (complete with artwork) that houses the two Blu-ray discs.

The “gift set” that includes the bell ornament is approximately thirteen dollars more expensive than the regular release. This is ridiculous since the bell ornament certainly isn’t worth thirteen dollars. Most people will be satisfied buying the standard release of the film.

The static menu on both discs feature Christmas tree artwork and are attractive and easy to navigate. However, one might wish for a slightly less generic design.

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Picture Quality:

4.5 of 5 Stars

The 1080p transfer is quite “wonderful” indeed. It is quite a step up from the latest DVD release of the film. The image is sharp and showcases details that were missed in previous transfers of the film. There are occasional moments of softness, but this is source related and these never become distracting. The contrast is excellent with deep blacks that do not seem to crush details and whites that remain natural. Grain seems to have been reduced slightly, but not to the extent that it creates any issues. Fans will be impressed with the level of detail evident in this transfer.

It is difficult to analyze the colorized version of the film. The transfer seems to be quite excellent with admirable detail. One cannot expect the colors to be natural because they simply aren’t. Purists will certainly wish to watch the original black and white version, which is more effective on almost every level. It is at least much better than many colorizations and the high definition transfer is well done.

iawl ss 3 bw

Sound Quality:

3.5 of 5 Stars

While it is perhaps disappointing that the disc does not contain an uncompressed audio track, the Dolby Digital Mono mix is actually pretty decent. The track doesn’t contain the pops, hiss, and other distractions that one might expect from a vintage track. Dialogue is always clear and never distorted. Even Dimitri Tiomkin’s score sounds good in this mix. While the effects are quaint by today’s standards, they are certainly represented accurately here. The truth of the matter is that a lossless track wouldn’t likely improve things very much. The source material wasn’t very dynamic to begin with. This track serves the film quite nicely.

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Special Features:

3 of 5 Stars

The “gift set” box advertises a special feature that is not actually included on the disc (and isn’t listed on the back of the actual case). It claims to include, A Personal Remembrance, which is a fourteen minute featurette with Frank Capra Jr. honoring his father and It’s a Wonderful Life. This wasn’t a very comprehensive featurette, but it did feature some interesting vintage interviews with Frank Capra and a short clip of James Stewart discussing the film. This feature was included on the more recent DVD releases of the film and is the only supplement not ported over for the Blu-ray release. While most (if not all) of the information covered on this absent featurette is covered in the Making of documentary included on the Blu-ray, it is still a little disappointing not to have it included on the Blu-ray disc.

The “Colorized” Version – (HD)

The second disc in the set features a colorized version of the feature. I have never been a fan of colorization and prefer to see the film as it was originally intended to be seen. However, it is nice to have a good transfer of it included here. It is certainly as good as can be expected.

The Making of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ – (480p, 22:45)

The made for television documentary about the making of this holiday classic contains quite a bit of interesting information and features retrospective interviews with director Frank Capra and James Stewart. This is certainly a very welcome addition to the disc.

Original Theatrical Trailer – (1080p, 1:48)

The original theatrical trailer is included here in high definition.

iawl ss 6 bw

Final Words:

It’s A Wonderful Life is a favorite holiday classic that belongs in everyone’s collection. The fantastic 1080p image transfer makes either one of the two Blu-ray editions of the film an essential purchase.

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